Mathematical Association of America : MathFest 2017

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What We Do

The Charles A. Dana Center is coming to Chicago for MathFest 2017! Experts from the Center and associates from around the country will present a range of applicable, action-oriented thinking and research. From mathematics pathways to student engagement, curriculum to implementation, these Dana Center sessions will answer questions and provoke new ideas.

The Dana Center seeks to ensure that ALL students in higher education will be:

  • Prepared to use mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills in their careers and personal lives,
  • Enabled to make timely progress towards completion of a certificate or degree, and
  • Empowered as mathematical learners.

Dana Center sponsored sessions at MathFest:

TCPS #13: Innovative Approaches to Calculus Preparation

Date: Thursday, July 27
Time: 1:00–3:55PM
Room: Salon A-3

This session is intended for teachers and researchers to share ideas about improving the preparation of students for college-level calculus.

Organizers: Benjamin V.C. Collins and Jennifer Good, University of Wisconsin–Platteville; Nathan Warnberg, University of Wisconsin–La Crosse

 

Modernizing the Pathway to Calculus: Lessons Learned at Palomar College

Frank Savina

Frank Savina

Date: Thursday, July 27
Time: 2:00–2:20PM
Room: Salon A-3

The Dana Center has designed a mathematics pathway, spanning two semesters, that prepares students at the intermediate algebra level to succeed in college-level calculus. The curriculum takes into account the latest research on challenges students face in learning calculus and employs intentional strategies to develop students’ skills as learners. This pathway has been taught over three semesters at several colleges and universities throughout the country. Presenters will share promising initial results from Palomar College in San Marcos, California, as well as content outcomes, design features, pedagogical techniques, and lessons learned from implementing this pathway.

Presenters: 
John Harland, Palomar College; Francisco Savina, Charles A. Dana Center, The University of Texas at Austin

 

Panel Session: Implementing Mathematics Pathways, Part 1 – State, System, and Transfer Level Strategies

Rebecca Hartzler

Rebecca Hartzler

Date: Friday, July 28
Time: 8:30–9:50AM
Room: Salon A-5

This two-part series on mathematics pathways implementation is hosted by the Charles A. Dana Center and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Part 1 is a Dana Center-led morning session that will focus on lessons learned during implementation and the four-phase coordinated strategy used. Mathematics department chairs and faculty from five different state task forces will share their experiences in restructuring policy, institutional programs, and course design to realize rigorous and accelerated mathematics pathways aligned to students’ programs of study.

Organizer: Rebecca Hartzler, Charles A. Dana Center, The University of Texas at Austin
Panelists: 
Helen Burn, Highline College; Ricardo Moena, University of Cincinnati; Michael Oehrtman, Oklahoma State University; Tammy Randolph, Southeast Missouri State University; Charles Watson, University of Central Arkansas
 

TCPS #7: Connecting Introductory Mathematics to Students’ Intended Majors and Careers

Date: Friday, July 28
Time: 1:00–4:55PM
Room: Salon C-4

This session explores the many ways in which introductory mathematics courses can be created or renewed to meet the needs of the partner disciplines and lay the groundwork for students’ future careers.

Organizers: Rebecca Hartzler, Charles A. Dana Center, The University of Texas at Austin; Suzanne I. Dorée, Augsburg College; Susan Ganter, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Thomas A. Hoft, University of St. Thomas

 

Incorporating Partner Discipline Voices in Retooling Introductory Statistics in Washington State

Date: Friday, July 28
Time: 3:00PM
Room: Salon C-4

This session details the process currently underway and the preliminary results related to aligning introductory statistics to specific programs of study in postsecondary institutions in Washington State. The session begins with background context, describing the state-level process that identified the need to seek input from partner disciplines in examining student learning outcomes for introductory statistics. The session then shifts to focus on the approach taken, including drawing from existing research conducted by the professional associations (e.g., MAA and ASA) and collecting primary data through interviews with faculty in partner disciplines such as business, nursing, and STEM fields.

Presenter: Helen Burn, Highline College
 

The Right Math for the Right Student at the Right Time: Facilitating Multidisciplinary Discussions

Date: Friday, July 28
Time: 3:20PM
Room: Salon C-4

The Dana Center seeks to ensure that all students in higher education will be prepared to use mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills in their careers and personal lives. To achieve this, it requires mathematics departments to shift from a service-oriented approach to being an engaged partner discipline. Our Presenter will share a suite of multidisciplinary discussion tools developed by the Dana Center, which faculty and administrators can use to prepare for and hold multidisciplinary discussions focused on identifying a default mathematics course requirement that is most relevant for each program of study. The presenter will also share how participants can customize these tools for use at their own institutions.

Presenter: Francisco Savina, Charles A. Dana Center, The University of Texas at Austin
 

Renovating Calculus Through Conversations with the Partner Disciplines

Date: Friday, July 28
Time: 3:40PM
Room: Salon C-4

As part of the 10-institution Collaborative Research: A National Consortium for Synergistic Undergraduate Mathematics via Multi-institutional Interdisciplinary Teaching Partnerships, Augsburg College is renovating the 3-semester calculus sequence to better meet the needs of the partner disciplines. Presenters will discuss their process of connecting with faculty from Biology, Business, Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, Environmental Science, and Physics—both on their campus and through the national consortium—to find out how students majoring in these fields use calculus. They will also share a summary of changes planned for Augsburg’s courses, including increasing the relevance and frequency of applications in the courses; adapting and developing materials to make quantitative labs the primary focus of the courses; and re-sequencing the topics to better mesh with the timing needed by the partner disciplines.

Presenters: Jody Sorensen and Suzanne Dorée, Augsburg College
 

Pre-calculus Student Activities for STEM Intending Students

Date: Friday, July 28
Time: 4:00PM
Room: Salon C-4

The Dana Center has developed an innovative new curriculum for STEM-intending students on the path to calculus. This curriculum provides students a meaningful pre-calculus experience that values and honors their future STEM courses by providing extensive opportunities to explore mathematics within authentic STEM contexts, which were designed in collaboration with faculty members from other disciplines. The presenter will describe these collaborations and offer specific examples of student activities that are tied to STEM disciplines.

Presenter: Stuart Boersma, Central Washington University
 

TCPS #16: Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning

Date: Saturday, July 29
Time: 8:30–11:05AM
Room: Salon A-2

The goal of Inquiry-Based Learning (IBL) is to transform students from consumers to producers of mathematics. Inquiry-based methods aim to help students develop a deep understanding of mathematical concepts and the processes of doing mathematics by putting those students in direct contact with mathematical phenomena, questions, and communities.

Organizers: Brian P. Katz, Augustana College; Victor I. Piercey, Ferris State University

 

Understanding Two-Year College Mathematics Faculty Perceptions and Use of Cooperative Learning

Adam Castillo

Adam Castillo


Date: Saturday, July 29
Time: 10:50-11:05AM
Room: Salon A-2

Cooperative learning is a well-documented pedagogical approach to promote student learning. However, there is little research on two-year college math faculty perceptions and their reported use in math courses. The presenter will share results from a pilot study on two-year college math faculty at four Texas community colleges involved in major math reform initiatives. The purposive sample was intended to identify participants familiar with cooperative learning, but not necessarily employing it with fidelity. The presenter will also discuss the process for testing and modifying research instruments for future research on two-year college math faculty at different colleges.

Presenter: Adam Castillo, Charles A. Dana Center, The University of Texas at Austin
 

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